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Unread 03-22-2011, 07:32 PM
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Default Measuring 1HN temperature coefficients in invisible protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

Measuring 1HN temperature coefficients in invisible protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy


Abstract A method based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiment is presented for measuring the temperature coefficients of amide proton chemical shifts of low populated â??invisibleâ?? protein states that exchange with a â??visibleâ?? ground state on the millisecond time-scale. The utility of the approach is demonstrated with an application to an I58D mutant of the Pfl6 Cro protein that undergoes exchange between the native, folded state and a cold denatured, unfolded conformational ensemble that is populated at a level of 6% at 2.5°C. A wide distribution of amide temperature coefficients is measured for the unfolded state. The distribution is centered about â??5.6 ppb/K, consistent with an absence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, on average. However, the large range of values (standard deviation of 2.1 ppb/K) strongly supports the notion that the unfolded state of the protein is not a true random coil polypeptide chain.
  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Pages 1-6
  • DOI 10.1007/s10858-011-9498-0
  • Authors
    • Guillaume Bouvignies, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
    • Pramodh Vallurupalli, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
    • Matthew H. J. Cordes, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0088, USA
    • D. Flemming Hansen, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
    • Lewis E. Kay, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada

Source: Journal of Biomolecular NMR
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